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MagicDraw 19.0 LTR SP3 Documentation


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Font tags

A font tag consists of three attributes: Size, Face, and Color.

Size

The Size attribute determines the font size. Possible values are integers from 1 to 7. The default base font size is 3. The greater the value is, the larger the size becomes.

  • The base font size for RTF documents is 24 dot (equivalent to 12 pt).
  • The base font size for ODF documents is 12 pt.
  • The base font size for OOXML documents is 12 pt.
  • The base font size for HTML documents is determined by the web browser.

Each value will be multiplied by two. Shown below is an example of the size attribute:

<font size="5">
It will be rendered as font size 16 pt
<font size="3">
It will be rendered as font size 12 pt
<font size="1">
It will be rendered as font size 8 pt

If the size attribute is specified without the face attribute, the default font will be determined by the template or document editor, unless the font tag is covered by other HTML elements, such as <code> or <tt>.

Face

The Face attribute defines the font name. If the face attribute is specified without the size attribute, the default size will be determined by the template or the document editor.

Color

The Color attribute specifies the text color. A color value can be either a hexadecimal number (prefixed with a hash mark) or one of the following sixteen colors. Colors are case-insensitive.

 The table below lists several Font Colors:

ColorHexadecimal
code
Black#000000
Silver #C0C0C0
Gray#808080
White#FFFFFF
Maroon#800000
Red#FF0000
Purple#800080
Fuchsia#FF00FF
Green#008000
Lime#00FF00
Olive#808000
Yellow#FFFF00
Navy#000080
Blue#0000FF
Teal#008080
Aqua#00FFFF

For example:

Sample of Font Tags

As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs

Font style tag

The table below lists various Font Style Elements:

Tag
name
Description
TTRenders teletyped or
monospaced text.
IRenders italic text.
BRenders bold text.
BIGRenders text in large
font.
SMALLRenders text in small
font.
STRIKE and SRenders strikethrough
text.
URenders underlined
text.
  • TT
    This tag will be rendered as <font face=”Courier New”>
  • I
    This tag is supported by the existing HTML conversion component.
  • B
    This tag is supported by the existing HTML conversion component.
  • BIG
    This tag will be rendered as <font size=”5”>
  • SMALL
    This tag will be rendered as <font size=”1”>
  • STRIKE and S
    This tag will be rendered in a strikethrough text.
  • U  
    This tag is supported by the existing HTML conversion component.

Phrase elements

The table below lists assorted Phrase elements:

Tag
name 
Function 
 EMIndicates emphasis.
 STRONGIndicates stronger emphasis.
 CITEContains a citation or a
reference to other sources.
DFN 

Indicates that this is the defining
instance of the enclosed term.

CODEDesignates a fragment of computer
code.
SAMPDesignates a sample output from
programs, scripts, etc.
KBDIndicates the text to be entered
by the user.
VARIndicates an instance of a variable
or program argument.
ABBRIndicates an abbreviated form such
as WWW, HTTP, URI, and Mass.
ACRONYMIndicates an acronym such as
WAC and radar.
  • EM 
    This tag will be rendered as <i>

  • STRONG 
    This tag will be rendered as <b>

  • CITE 
    This tag will be rendered as <i>

  • DFN 
    This tag will be rendered as <i>

  • CODE 
    This tag will be rendered as <font face=”Courier New”>

  • SAMP 
    This tag will be rendered as <font face=”Courier New”>

  • KBD 
    This tag will be rendered as <font face=”Courier New”>

  • VAR 
    This tag will be rendered as <i>

  • ABBR 
    This tag will be rendered as normal text.

  • ACRONYM 
    This tag will be rendered as normal text.

Ordered and unordered lists and list Item tags

Ordered and unordered lists are rendered in an identical manner; however, ordered list items are numbered.

The report engine supports both unordered and ordered lists without attributes. The list tag attributes will be ignored in the report output. The list tag attributes are type, start, value, and compact.

Neither unordered nor ordered lists are supported in XLSX and ODS templates.

Ordered lists

An Ordered List is defined by the <OL> element. This element contains one or more <LI> elements that define the actual items of the list.

Unlike unordered lists (UL), items in an ordered list have a definite sequence. A conversion will render each item in the list with a number. All <OL> attributes will be ignored in the report output. An example of an Ordered List tag is shown in the figure below.

Sample of Ordered List Tag

As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

The Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs

Nested ordered lists

HTML conversion will indent nested lists with respect to the current level of nesting. Each level will begin at 1. An example of the Nested Ordered List tag is shown in the figure below.

Sample of Nested OL Tags

 As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

The Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs

Unordered lists

An Unordered List is defined by the UL element. This element contains one or more LI elements that define the actual list items.

A conversion will render the UL element with a bullet preceding each list item. All UL attributes will be ignored in the report output. The figure below shows an example of an Unordered List tag:

Sample of UL Tags
 
As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs


Nested unordered lists

Lists can also be nested. HTML conversion will indent nested lists with respect to the current level of nesting.

HTML conversion should attempt to present a small filled-in circle to the first level, a small circle outline to the second level, and a filled-in square to the third level. Bullets after the third level are filled-in squares.  An example of the Nested Unordered List tag is shown in the figure below.

Sample of Nested UL Tags

As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

Sample of RTF, ODF or HTML Document Outputs
  

Definition list tags

A Definition List is defined by the DL element. An entry in the list is created using the DT element for the term being defined and the DD element for the definition of the term.

A definition list can have multiple terms for a given definition, as well as multiple definitions for a given term. Authors can also give a term without a corresponding definition, and vice versa, but such a structure rarely makes sense.

A conversion will render DT as a non-indent item and DD as a single indent item. The Definition List tag is not supported in the XLSX template. The figure below shows an example of a Definition List tag:

Sample of DL Tags

As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF or HTML will be:

Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs
 
Line and paragraph tags

A line break is defined by the <BR> element. This element inserts a single line break. It is an empty tag, meaning that it has no end tag. The line attributes will be ignored in the report output.

A paragraph is defined by the <P> element. The element automatically creates some space before and after itself. The paragraph attributes will be ignored in the report output. The figure below shows an example of a Line Break and Paragraph tag:

Sample of Line and Paragraph Tags

As shown in the figure below, the outputs in RTF, ODF, or HTML will be:

The Sample of RTF, ODF, or HTML Document Outputs

Preformatted text

A preformatted text is defined by the <PRE> element. All the space and carriage returns are rendered exactly as you type them. The preformatted attributes will be ignored in the report output. The figure below shows an example of the preformatted text:

Sample of Preformatted Text

As shown in the following two figures, the outputs in RTF/ ODF and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Heading tags

A heading is defined by the <H1>, <H2>, <H3>, <H4>, <H5>, or <H6> element. In this report, all heading tags will be rendered as <b> for ODT, RTF, and OOXML document outputs. The heading attributes will be ignored in the report output. The figure below shows an example of Heading tags.

Sample of Heading Tags

As shown in the following two figures, the outputs in RTF / ODF and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Link tags

A Link tag is defined by the <A> element. This element is used to create a link to another document with the href attribute. The href attribute specifies the destination of the link. Link tags are not supported in the XLSX template. The figure below shows an example of a Link tag:

Sample of Link Tag

As shown in the following three figures, the outputs in RTF, ODF, and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of RTF Document Output

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Table tags

A table is defined by the <TABLE> element. A table consists of multi-dimensional data arranged in rows and columns.

Table elements

The <TABLE> element takes a number of optional attributes to provide presentational alternatives in a document. The table attributes will be ignored in the report output, except for the following attributes:

  • border

Specifies the width in unit of the border of a table.

  • bgcolor

Specifies the table background color. Applying the background color here will affect the whole table.


Table elements are not supported in XLSX, PPTX, ODS, and ODP templates.

The figure below shows an example of table tags:

Sample of Table Tags

As shown in the following two figures, the outputs in RTF / ODF and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of RTF Document Output

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Border

Border width in HTML is specified in pixels. When the table attributes are converted into RTF, ODF, or OOXML, 1 pixel will be equal to 1 pt.

Color

The attribute value type "bgcolor" refers to color definitions as specified in [SRGB]. A color value may be either a hexadecimal number (prefixed by a hash mark) or one of the following sixteen colors. Colors are case-insensitive.

The following table lists common Table Element Colors.

ColorHexadecimal
Code
Black#00000000
Silver#C0C0C0
Gray#808080
White#FFFFFF
Maroon#800000
Red#FF0000
Purple#800080
Fuchsia#FF00FF
Green#008000
Lime#00FF00
Olive#808000
Yellow#FFFF00
Navy#000080
Blue#0000FF
Teal#008080
Aqua#00FFFF

Row elements

The <TR> elements act as a container for a row of table cells. The <TR> elements must be contained within a <TABLE>.

<TR> contains <TH> or <TD> elements, which in turn contain the actual data of the table. <TR> takes presentational attributes for specifying the alignment of cells within the row and the row's background color. The row attributes will be ignored in the report output, except for the following attributes:

  • align - Specifies the horizontal alignment for each cell in a row.
  • valign - Specifies the vertical position of a cell's content.  
  • bgcolor - Specifies the table background color. A background color will apply to rows only (see Color in Table Elements for more details).

Row elements are not supported in XLSX, PPTX, ODS, and ODP templates.

Align

This attribute specifies the alignment of data and the justification of text in a cell. Possible values are:

  • left -  Left-flushed data/Left-justified text. This is the default value for table data.
  • center - Centered data/Center-justified text. This is the default value for table headers.
  • right - Right-flushed data/Right-justified text.
  • justify - Double -justified text.
  • char - No text alignment set.

Valign

This attribute specifies the vertical position of data within a cell. Possible values are:

  • top: Cell data is flush with the top of a cell.
  • middle: Cell data is centered vertically within a cell. This is the default value.
  • bottom: Cell data is flush with the bottom of a cell.
  • baseline: No text alignment set.

The figure below shows an example of TR tags:

Sample of TR Tags

As shown in the following two figures, the outputs in RTF / ODF and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of RTF Document Output

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Cell elements

The <TD> elements define a data cell in a table. <TD> elements are contained within a <TR> element (a table row). The cell attributes will be ignored in the report output, except for the following attributes:

  • align  
    specifies the horizontal alignment for each cell in the row. See Align in Row Elements for more details.
  • valign
    specifies the vertical position of a cell's contents. See Valign in Row Elements for more details. 
  • bgcolor
    specifies the table background color. A background color will apply only to cells. See Color in Table Elements for more details.
  • rowspan
    rows spanned by the cell
  • colspan
    columns spanned by the cell

Cell elements are not supported in XLSX, PPTX, ODS, and ODP templates.

Row span

This attribute specifies the number of rows spanned by the current cell. The default value of this attribute is one ("1"). For an RTF output, the result of row span (*.rtf) is readable only in Word on Mac, and MS Word.

Column span

This attribute specifies the number of columns spanned by the current cell. The default value of this attribute is one ("1"). The figure below shows an example of a column span:

Sample of TD Tags As Column Spans

As shown in the following two figures, the outputs in RTF / ODF and HTML will be, respectively:

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Column width 

Table column width can be adjusted via attributes and stylesheet. For example, a column's width can be set by its width attribute. Percentage or pixel units are allowed for each <TD> element. You may set table width in <table> tags by absolute pixel value or percentage of page ratio, then allocate width from the table to each column later.


For example:

Using attributes:
<table width="500px">
        <tr>
                <td width="25%">25%</td>
                <td width="75%">75%</td>
       </tr>
</table>
<table width="500px">
        <tr>
                <td width="400px">400px</td>
                <td width="100px">100px</td>
        </tr>
</table> 


<table>
	<tr>
		<td width="30">30px</td>
		<td width="60">60px</td>
		<td width="90">90px</td>
	</tr>
</table>
 
<table>
	<tr>
		<td width="25%">25%</td>
		<td width="75%">75%</td>
	</tr>
</table>



Using Stylesheet:
<table style="width:50%">

	<tr>
		<td style="width:70%">70%</td>
		<td style="width:30%">30%</td>
	</tr>
</table>


DOCX, RTF and ODT templates retain their width values. The column width in the report is the same as defined in the Advanced HTML Editor dialog.

If the defined values exceed the paper margins, the table column widths will be converted to a percentage format so that the table appears within the page margins.

Header elements

The <TH> elements define a header cell in a table. <TH> elements are contained within a <TR> element (a table row). The header attributes will be ignored in the report output, except for the following attributes:

  • align
    specifies the horizontal alignment for each cell in the row. See Align in Row Elements for more details.
  • valign
    specifies the vertical position of a cell's contents. See Valign in Row Elements for more details. 
  • bgcolor
    specifies the table background color. A background color will apply to the whole table. See Color in Table Elements for more details.
  • rowspan
    rows spanned by the cell. See Row span in Cell Elements for more details.
  • colspan
    columns spanned by the cell. See Column span in Cell Elements for more details.

The default alignment for <TH> is center and the default font style for <TH> is bold. Header elements are not supported in XLSX, PPTX, ODS, and ODP templates. The figure below shows an example of header elements:

Sample of TH Tags As Header Elements

The following two figures show the outputs in RTF / ODF and HTML, respectively.

Sample of HTML Document Output (Open in Internet Explorer 7.0)

Image tags

The <img> tag embeds an image in a document. The <img> tag consists of four attributes: src, width, height, and alt.

src

The src attribute specifies the location of an image resource. The value of this attribute can be one of the following types:

  • A URL. The recognized scheme types are HTTP, HTTPS, and FILE
  • An absolute path such as c:/user/image.png. The path separator can be either /(slash) or \(blackslash) 

The output image format will depend on the format of the image source.

width

The width attribute specifies the width of an image in pixel units. For example, width = “100” or width = “100px”

height

The height attribute specifies the height of an image in pixel units. For example, height = “100”, or height = “100px”

Note

If the width or height attribute of an image is not specified, the size of the image will be calculated according to the following rules:

  • For an image file that contains the width and height properties, such as JPG, PNG, and GIF, the size of the image output will be calculated from the size of the image. 
  • For an image file that has no width and height properties, such as SVG, EMF, and WMF, the size of the image output will be calculated from the size of the paper.

alt

The alt attribute specifies the alternate text of an image in case the image cannot be displayed.

Note

  • The alternate text of image tags in DOCX, XLSX, and PPTX is available only in Microsoft Office.
  • The alternate text of image tags in RTF files is shown only in the Description field, rather than the Title field in Microsoft Word and OpenOffice Writer.
  • The alternate text of image tags in RTF files is not supported in LibreOffice.

In the event that the HTML code is as follows:

<img src="file:/D:/Waterlilies.jpg" width="200" height="200" alt="Waterlilies"/>


The image will appear as shown in the figure below.

Sample of IMG Tag

Superscript and subscript tags

Superscript

The <sup> tag defines a supersript, which is a very small letter, figure, or symbol, and printed above the line. Superscript characters can be used to write footnotes, like www[1], for example:

Subscript

The <sub> tag defines a subscript, which is a very small letter, figure, or symbol, and printed below the line. For example, subscript characters can be used to write chemical formulas, such as H2O:

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